Photo 23 Jul 227 notes mothernaturenetwork:

Artificial skin lets robots ‘feel’The newly developed sensors could be used in an early warning system to detect abnormal temperatures and tiny cracks in airplanes, bridges and other structures.

mothernaturenetwork:

Artificial skin lets robots ‘feel’
The newly developed sensors could be used in an early warning system to detect abnormal temperatures and tiny cracks in airplanes, bridges and other structures.

Photo 23 Jul 昨夜の月

昨夜の月

Video 12 Mar

ゆりかもめ

Photo 12 Mar カタバミ

カタバミ

Photo 12 Mar
Photo 12 Mar 梅、鳥

梅、鳥

Photo 12 Mar 福寿草@東慶寺

福寿草@東慶寺

Photo 12 Mar
Video 12 Mar

Nice weather for Ducks / Lemon Jelly 

Video 6 Feb

@Top of Mt.Fuji 2012

Photo 6 Feb 256 notes kateoplis:

The End of the Web, Search, and Computer as We Know It | Wired

People ask what the next web will be like, but there won’t be a next web.
The space-based web we currently have will gradually be replaced by a time-based worldstream. It’s already happening, and it all began with the lifestream, a phenomenon that I (with Eric Freeman) predicted in the 1990s and shared in the pages of Wired almost exactly 16 years ago.
This lifestream — a heterogeneous, content-searchable, real-time messaging stream — arrived in the form of blog posts and RSS feeds, Twitter and other chatstreams, and Facebook walls and timelines. Its structure represented a shift beyond the “flatland known as the desktop” (where our interfaces ignored the temporal dimension) towards streams, which flow and can therefore serve as a concrete representation of time.
It’s a bit like moving from a desktop to a magic diary: Picture a diary whose pages turn automatically, tracking your life moment to moment … Until you touch it, and then, the page-turning stops. The diary becomes a sort of reference book: a complete and searchable guide to your life. Put it down, and the pages start turning again.
Today, this diary-like structure is supplanting the spatial one as the dominant paradigm of the cybersphere: All the information on the internet will soon be a time-based structure. In the world of bits, space-based structures are static. Time-based structures are dynamic, always flowing — like time itself.
The web will be history.

kateoplis:

The End of the Web, Search, and Computer as We Know It | Wired

People ask what the next web will be like, but there won’t be a next web.

The space-based web we currently have will gradually be replaced by a time-based worldstream. It’s already happening, and it all began with the lifestream, a phenomenon that I (with Eric Freeman) predicted in the 1990s and shared in the pages of Wired almost exactly 16 years ago.

This lifestream — a heterogeneous, content-searchable, real-time messaging stream — arrived in the form of blog posts and RSS feeds, Twitter and other chatstreams, and Facebook walls and timelines. Its structure represented a shift beyond the “flatland known as the desktop” (where our interfaces ignored the temporal dimension) towards streams, which flow and can therefore serve as a concrete representation of time.

It’s a bit like moving from a desktop to a magic diary: Picture a diary whose pages turn automatically, tracking your life moment to moment … Until you touch it, and then, the page-turning stops. The diary becomes a sort of reference book: a complete and searchable guide to your life. Put it down, and the pages start turning again.

Today, this diary-like structure is supplanting the spatial one as the dominant paradigm of the cybersphere: All the information on the internet will soon be a time-based structure. In the world of bits, space-based structures are static. Time-based structures are dynamic, always flowing — like time itself.

The web will be history.

via kateoplis.
Photo 6 Feb 148 notes mothernaturenetwork:

Frogs are said to croak even longer and louder than usual when bad weather is on the horizon. When you hear their volume increase, you can assume a storm is brewing.
8 animals thought to predict the weather

mothernaturenetwork:

Frogs are said to croak even longer and louder than usual when bad weather is on the horizon. When you hear their volume increase, you can assume a storm is brewing.

8 animals thought to predict the weather

Photo 6 Feb 76 notes blogut:

Untitled by Jane Burson
[Tumblr]

blogut:

Untitled by Jane Burson

[Tumblr]

via Blogut.
Quote 6 Feb 403 notes
The books we need are the kind that act upon us like a misfortune, that make us suffer like the death of someone we love more than ourselves, that make us feel as though we were on the verge of suicide, or lost in a forest remote from all human habitation—a book should serve as the ax for the frozen sea within us.
— Franz Kafka
(via kateoplis)
Photo 6 Feb 1,932 notes nationalgeographicmagazine:

Tadpoles, Canada Photograph by Eiko Jones, My ShotTadpoles swim through a jungle of lily stalks in Cedar Lake on Vancouver Island, Canada.
Download Wallpaper (1600 x 1200 pixels)

nationalgeographicmagazine:

Tadpoles, Canada
Photograph by Eiko Jones, My Shot
Tadpoles swim through a jungle of lily stalks in Cedar Lake on Vancouver Island, Canada.

Download Wallpaper (1600 x 1200 pixels)


Design crafted by Prashanth Kamalakanthan. Powered by Tumblr.